8 Essential German Dishes You Have to Try Once

Let's Start

Sauerbraten:

A pot roast, usually of beef (but other meats such as lamb, mutton, pork, and traditionally, horse), marinated before slow cooking as pot roast. Sauerbraten is considered one of Germany's national dishes and is rich in flavor.

Wiener Schnitzel:

Although originally from Austria, this breaded and fried veal cutlet has become a staple in German cuisine, often served with lemon slices and parsley.

Bratwurst:

These grilled or fried sausages made of pork, beef, or veal are iconic in German food culture, often accompanied by sauerkraut or mustard.

Bratwurst:

These grilled or fried sausages made of pork, beef, or veal are iconic in German food culture, often accompanied by sauerkraut or mustard.

Pretzels (Brezeln):

Soft, twisted knots of dough, traditionally salted, are a must-try German snack, especially delicious when fresh from the bakery.

Spätzle:

A type of soft egg noodle or dumpling native to the Swabian region, Spätzle is often served as a side dish with meat or cheese.

Sauerkraut:

Fermented cabbage that's a classic German side dish, known for its sour taste and health benefits, often paired with sausages or meats.

Käsespätzle:

Germany's answer to macaroni and cheese, this dish combines Spätzle with creamy cheese and is topped with crispy onions.

Rouladen:

Thinly sliced beef rolled around a filling of bacon, onions, mustard, and pickles, then cooked to perfection. It's a hearty and satisfying meal.

Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte (Black Forest Cake):

A famous German dessert, this layered chocolate cake is filled with cherries, whipped cream, and a hint of cherry brandy.

Apfelstrudel:

A delicious apple strudel that's popular in southern Germany, made with thinly rolled dough, filled with apples, cinnamon, sugar, and raisins, then baked until golden.

LIKE

SHARE

SUBSCRIBE Arrow